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Concrete Rose book cover
Concrete Rose book cover

Concrete Rose


Young Adult

Maverick feels strongly about family ties, making choices he feels necessary to help support his mom while his King father serves time, and leave him literally holding his son in a doctor's waiting room after he gets paternity test results back and his babymomma ghosts. Now the child he's raising is impacting the lives of his family and his girlfriend, and the gang life he led to support them all financially could leave them all bearing his responsibilities since it endangers his life. It looks like he may have been offered a chance to go straight, but leaving the King Lords won't be easy, and a "real" job has high demand for low return.

Victoria's picture

Incredible prequel to Angie Thomas' The Hate U Give. Learning about who Maverick and Lisa are as teenagers as well as looking at exploring a different generation in Garden Heights felt like I gained so much perspective into Starr's life and upbringing. In a recent interview I watched with Thomas, she said the novels are stand-alone in a way and could be read in any order so if you missed The Hate U Give, check it out while you wait! -Victoria

Nana in the City book cover
Nana in the City book cover

Nana in the City

Lauren Castillo


A young boy is frightened by how busy and noisy the city is when he goes there to visit his Nana, but she makes him a fancy red cape that keeps him from being scared as she shows him how wonderful a place it is.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Grandma's Purse book cover
Grandma's Purse book cover

Grandma's Purse

Vanessa Brantley-Newton


When Grandma Mimi comes to visit, her granddaughter cannot wait to see what treasures she has hidden in her purse.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Drawn Together book cover
Drawn Together book cover

Drawn Together

Minh Le


A boy and his grandfather cross a language and cultural barrier using their shared love of art, storytelling, and fantasy.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

My Grandparents Love Me book cover
My Grandparents Love Me book cover

My Grandparents Love Me

Claire Freedman


Picture Books

A visit to Gran and Grandpa's house is always a special and fun time for a child.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Encyclopedia of Grannies book cover
Encyclopedia of Grannies book cover

Encyclopedia of Grannies

Eric Veille


Picture Books

An offbeat, humorous book that answers all your questions about grandmas-especially the ones you never thought to ask: Why do grannies always tell us to speak up? Why do they have creases on their faces? Are grannies flexible? How do you cheer up a sad granny? Exactly how old are grannies anyway?

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

The truth about grandparents book cover
The truth about grandparents book cover

The truth about grandparents

Elina Ellis


Picture Books

A child relates strange things that might be heard about grandparents but concludes that they are amazing.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

A Stopwatch from Grampa book cover
A Stopwatch from Grampa book cover

A Stopwatch from Grampa

Loretta Garbutt


Picture Books

A sensitive portrayal of loss and grief, told through a grandchild's inheritance of a stopwatch that belonged to Grampa. In this touching debut picture book about the loss of a beloved grandfather, author Loretta Garbutt explores the stages of grief with a delicate hand. The story opens with our narrator inheriting a stopwatch. For the grandchild, the object carries many cherished memories. "Grampa used to time everything. He timed me when I ran to the end of our street and back. Best speed, 24 seconds." As the year passes, and the seasons change, our narrator slowly moves through the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance). At first, the stopwatch is a painful reminder of Grampa. But in time, our character finds a special way to honor Grampa and carry forward his traditions.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Our Favorite Day book cover
Our Favorite Day book cover

Our Favorite Day

Joowon Oh


Follows Papa and his granddaughter as they spend another Thursday together.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Finding Grandma's Memories book cover
Finding Grandma's Memories book cover

Finding Grandma's Memories

Jiyeon Pak


Picture Books

A little girl helps her grandma with her memory.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Where Are You From book cover
Where Are You From book cover

Where Are You From

Yamile Saied Mendez


Picture Books

"When a young girl is asked where she's from--where she's really from--she's no longer as she was. She decides to turn to her dear abuelo for some help with this ever-persistent question. But he doesn't quite give her the answer she expects."

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Hey Grandude! book cover
Hey Grandude! book cover

Hey Grandude!

Paul McCartney


Picture Books

Grandude brightens a dreary weekend for his visiting grandchildren, Lucy, Tom, Em, and Bob, by using his magic compass and postcards to take them on adventures around the world.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

MY Hippie Grandmother book cover
MY Hippie Grandmother book cover

MY Hippie Grandmother

Reeve Lindbergh


Picture Books

A young girl describes all the things she likes about her grandmother, including the purple bus she drives, growing vegetables, picketing City Hall, and playing the banjo.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Nana Akua goes to school  book cover
Nana Akua goes to school  book cover

Nana Akua goes to school

Tricia Elam Walker


Picture Books

Zura is worried about how her classmates will react to her Ghanaian Nana's tattoos on Grandparents Day, but Nana finds a way to show how special and meaningful they are.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Little Owl's bedtime book cover
Little Owl's bedtime book cover

Little Owl's bedtime

Debi Gliori

jE Gliori

Little Owl cannot sleep--his pillow is lumpy, his quilt too hot, and he hears strange noises--until Mommy Owl says that tomorrow, and his grandparents' visit, will come sooner if he sleeps.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Someday we will : a book for grandparents and grandchildren book cover
Someday we will : a book for grandparents and grandchildren book cover

Someday we will : a book for grandparents and grandchildren

Pam Webb

jE Webb

Grandparents and children anticipate their next visit by imagining all of the wonderful things they will do together, such as playing games, reading library books, and riding bicycles.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

I'll be the water : a story of a grandparent's love book cover
I'll be the water : a story of a grandparent's love book cover

I'll be the water : a story of a grandparent's love

Alec Aspinwall

jE Aspinwal
Picture Books

Joshua and his grandfather love being together. More than anything else they love fishing. But Grandpa gets sick and is in the hospital a long time. When he gets out, he and Joshua share one more fishing adventure, and Grandpa promises Joshua that he will always be near. "Think of it this way," Grandpa says. "Today, you and I are like two fish swimming together in this lake. When I die, things will be different. I won't be a fish anymore, but I'll become something even better. My love will be like the water in the lake. You might think I'm not with you, but we'll be closer than ever because you'll be surrounded by my love."

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

A day at the museum book cover
A day at the museum book cover

A day at the museum

Christine A. Platt

jREADER Platt Christin
Early Readers

"It's a surprise visit! Ana & Andrew are excited when Grandma comes to visit. While she is there, the family tours the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture and learns about important African American achievements"--Page [4] of cover.

Karen's picture

Added by Karen

Coquí in the city book cover
Coquí in the city book cover

Coquí in the city

Nomar Perez


A heartfelt picture book based on the author-illustrator's own experiences, about a boy who moves to the U.S. mainland from Puerto Rico and realizes that New York City might have more in common with San Juan than he initially thought.

Karen's picture

The cover art is so colorful! I'm looking forward to reading this one. Book is on order -Karen

The Patron Saints of Nothing book cover
The Patron Saints of Nothing book cover

The Patron Saints of Nothing


Read Woke, Young Adult

When seventeen-year-old Jay Reguero learns his Filipino cousin and former best friend, Jun, was murdered as part of President Duterte's war on drugs, he flies to the Philippines to learn more.

Victoria's picture

This is the story of Jay- a Filipino-American straddling two countries; the US where he's spent most of his life and the Philippines, where his parents chose to leave shortly after he was born in pursuit of a better life. Author Randy Ribay excels in exploring identity, what it means to look a certain way and be interpreted in another. Another theme I appreciated was no matter how much you feel a part of the country you left behind, you will often be seen as an outsider once you leave making you question where your home really is. This book is an excellent read for young adults and adults. It humanizes victims of the war on drugs in the Philippines and allows the reader to explore the conflict from alternative perspectives. This is an exceptional read and provides many opportunities for discussion around immigration, politics, family tradition and connections. -Victoria

King and the Dragonflies book cover
King and the Dragonflies book cover

King and the Dragonflies


Black History, Diverse Characters

"In a small but turbulent Louisiana town, one boy's grief takes him beyond the bayous of his backyard, to learn that there is no right way to be yourself"-- Provided by publisher.

Victoria's picture

Kacen Callendar's 2021 Coretta Scott King Author Honor is a fantastic read. This book will have you hooked from the beginning; highly descriptive locations, complex and relatable characters and important themes that will evoke discussion with young readers. I would recommended this for ages 10 and up. -Victoria

The midnight library : A Novel book cover
The midnight library : A Novel book cover

The midnight library : A Novel

Matt Haig

eAUDIO
Fiction, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Literary Fiction

"'Between life and death there is a library, and within that library, the shelves go on forever. Every book provides a chance to try another life you could have lived. To see how things would be if you had made other choices... Would you have done anything different, if you had the chance to undo your regrets?' A dazzling novel about all the choices that go into a life well lived, from the internationally bestselling author of Reasons to Stay Alive and How To Stop Time. Somewhere out beyond the edge of the universe there is a library that contains an infinite number of books, each one the story of another reality. One tells the story of your life as it is, along with another book for the other life you could have lived if you had made a different choice at any point in your life. While we all wonder how our lives might have been, what if you had the chance to go to the library and see for yourself? Would any of these other lives truly be better? In The Midnight Library, Matt Haig's enchanting new novel, Nora Seed finds herself faced with this decision. Faced with the possibility of changing her life for a new one, following a different career, undoing old breakups, realizing her dreams of becoming a glaciologist; she must search within herself as she travels through the Midnight Library to decide what is truly fulfilling in life, and what makes it worth living in the first place"-- Provided by publisher.

Anne M's picture

Before I begin, The Midnight Library contains themes of depression and a description of a suicide. Nora Seed believes she has made some very wrong choices in her life and none of it can be rectified. In trying to end her life, Nora finds herself in a library--a library of her own somewhere between life and death. All the books on the shelf contain different versions of her life if she had made different choices along the way, both small and large. Nora Seed gets to explore these lives from pursuing Olympic swimming to fronting a rock band with the opportunity to make a permanent swap. But Nora begins to understand that there are many things about her original life that were significant and meaningful. Carey Mulligan narrates the audio and she is wonderful. -Anne M

How to be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals book cover
How to be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals book cover

How to be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals


Memoir, Animals, Nature

A naturalist and adventurer discusses the personalities and quirks of thirteen animals who have profoundly affected her, exploring themes of learning to become empathetic, creating families, coping with loss, and the otherness and sameness of people and animals.

Victoria's picture

A delightful book for anyone who admires the sentient intellect and all the life lessons animals outside of own species can share with us-if we're paying attention. -Victoria

Sing, unburied, sing : a novel book cover
Sing, unburied, sing : a novel book cover

Sing, unburied, sing : a novel

Jesmyn Ward

FICTION Ward Jesmyn
Fiction, Diverse Characters, Read Woke

"A searing and profound Southern odyssey through Mississippi's past and present"--

Jason's picture

Ward's story grapples with the trauma of racism, gun violence, and incarceration via a multi-generational household. Her story is set in rural southern Mississippi yet these themes are familiar to many in America. Chapters are told from alternating character's point of view including those of a ghost. -Jason

One day : the extraordinary story of an ordinary 24 hours in America book cover
One day : the extraordinary story of an ordinary 24 hours in America book cover

One day : the extraordinary story of an ordinary 24 hours in America

Gene Weingarten

973 /Weingarten
Nonfiction, History

"The Extraordinary Story of an Ordinary 24 Hours in America"--

Anne M's picture

Washington Post humor columnist Gene Weingarten picked a single day from the last 40 years to see if there was anything worth noting about an ordinary day in America. At first, he thought he was doomed. The day chosen at random was December 28, 1986, a Sunday that landed right in the middle of two major holidays. This time of year is always a slow news time. But Weingarten found some truly extraordinary stories from around the country, including Cedar Rapids. This book is both funny and heartbreaking, containing stories of individual triumphs as well as tragedies. It may be a snapshot of America in the late 1980's, but many of the themes hold for today. -Anne M

Light of the Jedi book cover
Light of the Jedi book cover

Light of the Jedi

Charles Soule

SCIENCE FICTION Star Wars
Science Fiction

"The lead book in an exciting cross-publishing event, exploring a new era of Star Wars storytelling: the never-before-seen in any medium High Republic"--

Brian's picture

Light of the Jedi marks the beginning of a brand new era in Star Wars--The High Republic. It takes places 200 years before Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, and introduces us to a huge new cast of characters. We meet many of them at a breakneck pace and get to see the Jedi in their prime. This is an exciting novel that I think is a perfect introduction to Star Wars books. -Brian

Solutions and other problems book cover
Solutions and other problems book cover

Solutions and other problems

Allie Brosh

817.6 /Brosh
Memoir, Graphic Novels

Solutions and Other Problems includes humorous stories from Allie Brosh's childhood; the adventures of her very bad animals; merciless dissection of her own character flaws; incisive essays on grief, loneliness, and powerlessness; as well as reflections on the absurdity of modern life.

Frannie's picture

The latest from graphic memoirist Allie Brosh builds on her previous book Hyberbole and a Half in the best way possible. Same great childlike scrawl done in MS Paint, new deeper truths. At times I sat on my couch giggling and kicking my legs from laughter trying not to disturb other people in my home, and at others I was paralyzed with some of the darker turns. I won't divulge details, but urge you to challenge yourself not to laugh and then also look deeper. This was also 1 of 10 2021 Alex Award winners, a prize for books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults. -Frannie

Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder book cover
Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder book cover

Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

Richard Louv


Nature, Science

As children’s connections to nature diminish and the social, psychological, and spiritual implications become apparent, new research shows that nature can offer powerful therapy for such maladies as depression, obesity, and attention deficit disorder. Environment-based education dramatically improves standardized test scores and grade-point averages and develops skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Anecdotal evidence strongly suggests that childhood experiences in nature stimulate creativity. In Last Child in the Woods, Louv talks with parents, children, teachers, scientists, religious leaders, child-development researchers, and environmentalists who recognize the threat and offer solutions. Louv shows us an alternative future, one in which parents help their kids experience the natural world more deeply—and find the joy of family connectedness in the process.

Mari's picture

This book presents an interesting examination of why children no longer play outside, the health benefits of interacting with nature and ways to encourage kids and communities to reconnect with and the outdoor world. All of this resonated deeply with me, and I felt grateful for the parts of my childhood spent running around in the woods, in the creek, through the farmlands, on bikes, all unsupervised with the neighborhood kids. Now when I go back to visit my dad at my childhood home, the forest is gone and the rural countryside is developed with new houses, streets, businesses, schools, and even hotels and a sports plex. think it's hard to dispute the author's message of how formative these experiences are to the development of children in becoming productive members of society and personally made me want to be engaged more in nature as adult. It also left me feeling a little sad knowing that most children today and in the future, as quoted by a child in the book, "like to play indoors better 'cause that's where all the electrical outlets are." -Mari

The great influenza : the epic story of the deadliest plague in history book cover
The great influenza : the epic story of the deadliest plague in history book cover

The great influenza : the epic story of the deadliest plague in history

John M. Barry

614.518 /Barry
Science

At the height of WWI, history’s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.

Mari's picture

I found this book to be a generally fascinating account of medical research history. It provides a history of American medicine, especially the development of modern day medical schools, an explanation of viruses, histories of other epidemics. Of course my interest was sparked to read this in order to draw a comparison between this pandemic a century ago and the current one, but this book has a lot more, and provides a great deal of perspective. Lasting from February 1918 to April 1920, the Spanish-flu infected 500 million people–about a third of the world's population at the time. The death toll is estimated between 17 million and 50 million, some even claim 100 million, making it one of the deadliest pandemics in human history. I think this would be a great read for any individuals in leadership roles who have the power to control the outcome of this pandemic, and of course those are simply curious. -Mari

We are all the same in the dark : a novel book cover
We are all the same in the dark : a novel book cover

We are all the same in the dark : a novel


Thriller, Suspense

A seasoned cop's interest in a mysterious one-eyed girl takes her back to the worst night of her life in this fast-paced thriller from the internationally bestselling author of Black-Eyed Susans. They call her Angel. Found on the side of a remote highway, half-dead and blowing wishes in a field of dandelions, the young girl refuses to speak. No one knows who she is or where she came from--only that she fell from the sky. It's Wyatt who finds her and takes her home to nurse her back to health, setting into motion the town's rumor mill. A pariah, Wyatt still believes he can still communicate with his long-gone sister, and he might be the only one left who knows the truth about the night of her disappearance. The night that Wyatt's cousin, Odette Tucker, also lost something important: her leg. Now a cop, uninhibited by her prosthetic, Odette must reenter Wyatt's ghost-ridden world. In Angel's case and her beautiful green eye, she sees her once-broken self and all the things she was told she'd never do. As she begins to coax Angel into speaking and slowly pieces together her identity, Odette is ignited to reopen the cold case that has haunted her. Soon she is ensnared in a lethal game of cat and mouse with someone who doesn't want that night revisited. The night that inspired her to become a cop, the night her friend disappeared and they both exploded into a small Texas town's dark, violent mythology.

Mari's picture

A gritty, violent thriller set in Texas with a new mystery sparked by an old one. Odette Tucker follows in her cop father's footsteps after a decade old disappearance of a small town's homecoming queen and sweetheart, Trumanell on a night that changes Odette's life forever. Trumanell's brother Wyatt, the town's outcast, picks up a young girl with a missing eye, and Odette rushes to action and brings the young girl, whom Wyatt dubs Angel, to keep her safe. I quickly devoured this gut-wrenching and suspenseful story. -Mari

Caste : the origins of our discontents book cover
Caste : the origins of our discontents book cover

Caste : the origins of our discontents

Isabel Wilkerson

305.5122 /Wilkerson

The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power-- which groups have it and which do not. Wilkerson explores how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. She discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. -- adapted from jacket

Victoria's picture

This book has helped me to process much of what has happened in the US recently. Inequity goes beyond racism and classism. Rather, Wilkerson contends it's rooted in caste; an historically manufactured human pecking order set on ranking humanity that has had lasting impacts not only on our institutions but also in framing our daily individual biases and worldviews. Though originally designed to produce well-oiled economic systems and societies (at the behest of those who were subjugated,) today caste still effectively divides; foreshadowing how others see us, how we see them and our perceived place in economies. Insightful, impactful and I could not put this down until I had read every last word! A fantastic piece of Nonfiction! -Victoria

The sky atlas : the greatest maps, myths and discoveries of the universe book cover
The sky atlas : the greatest maps, myths and discoveries of the universe book cover

The sky atlas : the greatest maps, myths and discoveries of the universe

Edward Brooke-Hitching

520.9 /Brooke-Hitching
Nonfiction, Art / Art History, Science

"THE SKY ATLAS assembles some of the most beautiful maps and charts ever created to understand the skies above us. This richly illustrated treasury showcases the finest examples of celestial cartography-a glorious art often overlooked by modern map books-as well as medieval manuscripts, masterpiece paintings, ancient star catalogues, antique instruments, and other curiosities. This is the sky as it has never been presented before: the realm of stars and planets, but also of gods, devils, weather wizards, flying sailors, ancient aliens, mythological animals, and rampaging spirits. Here are the crystal cosmos of the ancient Greeks; the medieval sea, sailed by ships above the clouds; Tibetan sky burials; secret messages hidden in starlight, and much more. With thrilling stories and gorgeous artwork, this remarkable atlas explores our fascination with the sky across time and cultures to form an extraordinary chronicle of cosmic imagination and discovery"-- Provided by publisher.

Melody's picture

Excited to say I'm first in line for this book! I happened upon this book while cataloging and it's just gorgeous. It's full of illustrations of historic interpretations of our sky and its relationship to earth. I can't wait to take it home and flip through it on my downtime. -Melody

The office : the untold story of the greatest sitcom of the 2000s book cover
The office : the untold story of the greatest sitcom of the 2000s book cover

The office : the untold story of the greatest sitcom of the 2000s

Andy Greene

791.4572 /Office
Art / Art History

"The untold stories behind The Office, one of the most iconic television shows of the twenty-first century, told by its creators, writers, and actors"--

Amanda's picture

I loved the show, I loved the characters, and I could feel the love and devotion everyone working on the show had for The Office as I read this book. I've watched the episodes with the commentaries and am an avid listener of the Office Ladies Podcast, and even with all that random trivia in my head, I learned so many fun facts about the show through this book. So many gems! Well worth reading for any fan of the show. You're going to fall in love with the episodes and actors (in particular Steve Carell!!) and gain a whole new appreciation for the writers and crew. Highly recommended! -Amanda

Sisters in hate : American women on the front lines of white nationalism book cover
Sisters in hate : American women on the front lines of white nationalism book cover

Sisters in hate : American women on the front lines of white nationalism

Seyward Darby

322.42 /Darby
Political

"After the election of Donald J. Trump, journalist Seyward Darby went looking for the women of the so-called "alt-right" -- really just white nationalism with a new label. The mainstream media depicted the alt-right as a bastion of angry white men, but was it? As women headlined resistance to the Trump administration's bigotry and sexism, most notably at the Women's Marches, Darby wanted to know why others were joining a movement espousing racism and anti-feminism. Who were these women, and what did their activism reveal about America's past, present, and future? Darby researched dozens of women across the country before settling on three -- Corinna Olsen, Ayla Stewart, and Lana Lokteff. Each was born in 1979, and became a white nationalist in the post-9/11 era. Their respective stories of radicalization upend much of what we assume about women, politics, and political extremism. Corinna, a professional embalmer who was once a body builder, found community in white nationalism before it was the alt-right, while she was grieving the death of her brother and the end of her marriage. For Corinna, hate was more than just personal animus -- it could also bring people together. Eventually, she decided to leave the movement and served as an informant for the FBI. Ayla, a devoutly Christian mother of six, underwent a personal transformation from self-professed feminist to far-right online personality. Her identification with the burgeoning "tradwife" movement reveals how white nationalism traffics in society's preferred, retrograde ways of seeing women. Lana, who runs a right-wing media company with her husband, enjoys greater fame and notoriety than many of her sisters in hate. Her work disseminating and monetizing far-right dogma is a testament to the power of disinformation. With acute psychological insight and eye-opening reporting, Darby steps inside the contemporary hate movement and draws connections to precursors like the Ku Klux Klan. Far more than mere helpmeets, women like Corinna, Ayla, and Lana have been sustaining features of white nationalism. Sisters in Hate shows how the work women do to normalize and propagate racist extremism has consequences well beyond the hate movement."--Amazon.

Amanda's picture

This book shows how easily a person can be seduced by racism and white nationalism, how innocuous it can seem, and how deep a person can get into it. One of the main women featured is no longer a participant in the culture, and has found a different way to belong, and I really wish the best for her. This was a fascinating and engaging read, and I highly recommend it. -Amanda

Sometimes you have to lie : the life and times of Louise Fitzhugh, renegade author of Harriet the spy book cover
Sometimes you have to lie : the life and times of Louise Fitzhugh, renegade author of Harriet the spy book cover

Sometimes you have to lie : the life and times of Louise Fitzhugh, renegade author of Harriet the spy

Leslie Brody

BIOGRAPHY Fitzhugh, Louise
Biographies

"The protagonist and anti-heroine of Louise Fitzhugh's masterpiece Harriet the Spy, first published first in 1964, continues to mesmerize generation after generation of readers. Harriet is an erratic, unsentimental, and endearing prototype--someone very like the woman who dreamed her up, author and artist Louise Fitzhugh. Born in 1928, Fitzhugh was raised in a wealthy home in segregated Memphis, and she escaped her cloistered world and made a beeline for New York as soon as she could. Her expanded milieu stretched from the lesbian bars of Greenwich Village to the dance clubs of Harlem, on to the resurgent artist studios of post-war New York, France, and Italy. Her circle of friends included artists like Maurice Sendak and playwrights like Lorraine Hansberry. In the 1960s, Fitzhugh wrote Harriet the Spy, and in doing so she introduced "new realism" into children's books-she launched a genre of children's books that allowed characters to experience authentic feelings and acknowledged topics that were formerly considered taboo. Fitzhugh's books are full of resistance: to liars, to conformity, to authority, and even (radically, for a children's author) to make-believe. As a commercial children's author and lesbian, Fitzhugh often had to disguise the nature of her most intimate relationships. She lived her life as a dissenter--a friend to underdogs, outsiders, and artists--and her masterpiece remains long after her death to influence and provoke new generations of readers. Harriet is massively influential among girls and women in contemporary culture; she is the missing link between Jo March and Scout Finch, and it's not surprising that writers have thought of her as a kind of patron saint for misfit writers and unfeminine girls. This lively, rich biography brings Harriet's creator into the frame, shedding new light on an extraordinary author and her marvelous creation"--

Amanda's picture

An absolutely delightful and engaging biography on the woman behind one of my favorite books, Harriet the Spy. I knew absolutely nothing about Louise Fitzhugh prior to reading this, and found her a truly wonderful artist who knew so many people and had a genuine talent that Harriet the Spy was able to exemplify... but she had so much more to offer. I highly recommend this to fans of Harriet, anyone who appreciates LGBTQ+ history, and fans of midcentury literature in general. -Amanda

The only good Indians : a novel book cover
The only good Indians : a novel book cover

The only good Indians : a novel

Stephen Graham Jones

eAUDIO
Horror, Read Woke

"Peter Straub's Ghost Story meets Liane Moriarty's Big Little Lies in this American Indian horror story of revenge on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Four American Indian men from the Blackfeet Nation, who were childhood friends, find themselves in a desperate struggle for their lives, against an entity that wants to exact revenge upon them for what they did during an elk hunt ten years earlier by killing them, their families, and friends"--

Casey's picture

The Only Good Indians is a masterpiece, and not for the faint of heart. If you're up for it, I recommend going into this title cold, cover material only, and no spoilers here! However, I will say that Shaun Taylor-Corbett's narration lends the perfect tone to Stephen Graham Jones's hauntingly beautiful prose. I'm adding it to my 2021 rereads list for the Fall, as I'm still thinking about it and have yet to pick up another novel after finishing weeks ago. -Casey

Snow book cover
Snow book cover

Snow

John Banville

MYSTERY Banville John
Fiction, Mystery

1957. Detective Inspector St. John Strafford has been summoned to County Wexford to investigate when a parish priest is found dead in Ballyglass House, the family seat of the aristocratic, secretive Osborne family. The Catholic Church rules Ireland with an iron fist, and Strafford-- a Protestant-- faces obstruction at every turn. There is a culture of silence in this tight-knit community, and Stafford learns the Osbornes are not at all what they seem. When his own deputy goes missing, Strafford must work to unravel the ever-expanding mystery before the community's secrets, like the snowfall itself, threatens to obliterate everything. -- adapted from jacket

Candice's picture

I've been saving this to read over the holiday break...set in 1957, in County Wexford, Ireland. A craggy inspector investigates the murder of a priest in the local aristocratic home of the town's wealthy family. He has to deal to with a family with dark secrets and a small town that doesn't give up much to outsiders, all while battling the winter weather and snow as far as the eye can see. Perfect. -Candice

Other people : Days of the Bagnold summer & Driving short distances book cover
Other people : Days of the Bagnold summer & Driving short distances book cover

Other people : Days of the Bagnold summer & Driving short distances

Joff Winterhart

GRAPHIC NOVEL Winterhart
Graphic Novels

A librarian mother spends a summer with her metalhead teenage son. A depressive young man becomes an apprentice to a legend-in-his-own mind. These people you never think about will make you reexamine yourself.

Stacey's picture

I came across this lovely book after checking out the Belle & Sebastian soundtrack to the film "Days of the Bagnold Summer." The library doesn't have the movie (and it doesn't look like it's orderable?) but we did have this graphic novel on which it was based. The two stories in this book have just the right kind of slow, melancholy description of everyday life that is perfect for 2020. A mother and son spend several weeks together not doing much... A wayward 28-year-old is given a pity job with a relative that involves driving around depressing scenes all day... But the observations and drawings are very poignant and worth spending some time with. -Stacey

Pachinko book cover
Pachinko book cover

Pachinko

Min Jin Lee

FICTION Lee Min
Historical Fiction

"A new tour de force from the bestselling author of Free Food for Millionaires, for readers of The Kite Runner and Cutting for Stone. PACHINKO follows one Korean family through the generations, beginning in early 1900s Korea with Sunja, the prized daughter of a poor yet proud family, whose unplanned pregnancy threatens to shame them all. Deserted by her lover, Sunja is saved when a young tubercular minister offers to marry and bring her to Japan. So begins a sweeping saga of an exceptional family in exile from its homeland and caught in the indifferent arc of history. Through desperate struggles and hard-won triumphs, its members are bound together by deep roots as they face enduring questions of faith, family, and identity"--

Heidi K's picture

OK, OK...so this isn't the newest book and many have already heard about it or even actually read it by now. But, I need to add this as a recommendation at this time to encourage everyone who still has this in their to-read pile. Perhaps you, like me, have been a bit intimidated by the size of the novel. I had no idea how fast reading this would go once I started it! It's one of those books I look for moments to read bits and pieces of, and can't wait to go back to. So if you're still waiting to read Pachinko, like I was: What are you waiting for? This is the perfect saga to whisk you away from your reality this winter. -Heidi K

Hamnet book cover
Hamnet book cover

Hamnet

Maggie O'Farrell

eAUDIO
Historical Fiction, Fiction

"A thrilling departure: a short, piercing, deeply moving novel about the death of Shakespeare's 11 year old son Hamnet--a name interchangeable with Hamlet in 15th century Britain--and the years leading up to the production of his great play. England, 1580. A young Latin tutor--penniless, bullied by a violent father--falls in love with an extraordinary, eccentric young woman--a wild creature who walks her family's estate with a falcon on her shoulder and is known throughout the countryside for her unusual gifts as a healer. Agnes understands plants and potions better than she does people, but once she settles with her husband on Henley Street in Stratford she becomes a fiercely protective mother and a steadfast, centrifugal force in the life of her young husband, whose gifts as a writer are just beginning to awaken when his beloved young son succumbs to bubonic plague. A luminous portrait of a marriage, a shattering evocation of a family ravaged by grief and loss, and a hypnotic recreation of the story that inspired one of the greatest masterpieces of all time, Hamnet is mesmerizing, seductive, impossible to put down--a magnificent departure from one of our most gifted novelists"--

Anne M's picture

This was my favorite book of the year. Maggie O'Farrell beautifully writes about the loss of a child and its impact on a family, specifically the loss of Hamnet, the young son of William Shakespeare. It was incredibly written. Descriptions are vivid. Characters become familiar. The story well-paced. It was one of those books where I kept wanting to listen--I would dutifully find more chores to do, run another mile, and organize my house just to keep listening. It is a novel that will stay with me. -Anne M

The women in black : a novel book cover
The women in black : a novel book cover

The women in black : a novel

Madeleine St. John

FICTION St. John, Madeleine
Fiction, Historical Fiction

"The women in black, so named for the black frocks they wear while working at an upscale department store called Goode's, are run off their feet selling ladies' cocktail dresses during the busy season. But in Sydney in the 1950s, there's always time to pursue other goals... Patty, in her mid-thirties, has been working at Goode's for years. She's married to Frank, who eats a steak for dinner every night, watches a few minutes of TV, and then turns in, leaving Patty to her own thoughts. She wants a baby, but Frank is always too tired for that kind of thing. Sweet Fay wants to settle down with a nice man, but somehow nice men don't see her as marriage material. The glamorous Magda runs the high-end gowns department. A Slovenian émigré who met her Hungarian husband in a refugee camp, Magda is clever and cultured. She finds the Australians to be unfashionable, and dreams of opening her own boutique one day. Lisa, a teenager awaiting the results of her final exams, takes a job at Goode's for the holidays. She wants to go to university and secretly dreams of being a poet, but her father objects to both notions. Magda takes Lisa under her wing, and by the time the last marked-down dress has been sold, all of their lives will be forever changed" --

Anne M's picture

Looking for a light and funny read? Set in an Australian 1950's department store during the holiday season, Madeleine St. John's "The Women in Black" is delightful. You'll meet Lisa, Patty, Fay, and Magda--all at different points in their lives--all with different hopes and dreams--as they work during the busiest time of the year. Christmas does not play a major part in this book other than it being a specific time and adding additional stress both at work and at home. What is important here is the relationships of the women, the changes they experience...and of course, the department store. -Anne M

The canyon's edge book cover
The canyon's edge book cover

The canyon's edge

Dusti Bowling

jFICTION Bowling Dusti
Kids

A year after the death of her mother in a restaurant shooting, Nora is left struggling to stay alive when a climbing trip with her father goes terribly wrong.

Becky's picture

One year after the traumatic death of her mother, Nora and her father embark on a rock-climbing expedition in a remote Southwest canyon. A flash flood separates Nora from her father, and she must find a way to survive the elements, reconnect with her father, and work through her grief. Written in verse, Dusti Bowling effectively brings an emotional resonance to this thrilling story of survival. I absolutely loved this book and would recommend it for middle grade readers and up. -Becky

Fallout : the Hiroshima cover-up and the reporter who revealed it to the world book cover
Fallout : the Hiroshima cover-up and the reporter who revealed it to the world book cover

Fallout : the Hiroshima cover-up and the reporter who revealed it to the world

Lesley M. M. Blume

940.5425 /Blume
Nonfiction, History

"New York Times bestselling author Lesley M.M. Blume reveals how a courageous reporter uncovered one of greatest and deadliest cover-ups of the 20th century-the true effects of the atom bomb-potentially saving millions of lives"--

Anne M's picture

"Fallout" chronicles the writing of John Hersey's "Hiroshima," originally published in the August 31st, 1946 issue of "The New Yorker." The article chronicled the experiences of six survivors of the United States' dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. What is now seen as a standard text, assigned reading in many high schools, may never have been written. Hersey faced an uphill climb to report the story. There was the United States government and its limitations on where journalists could go and what they could report, as well as their denial of long-term health effects, such as radiation sickness. Also, how do you report this story to an American public that is ready to move on after a decade of war information? Every day they saw images of bomb-out cities and read statistics of the dead and the wounded in the newspapers. They spent years seeing the Japanese as an enemy. How could Hersey make this story resonate? Blume provides a fascinating account of how Hersey struck a chord. If you are a reader of "The New Yorker," this book provides great insight on the inner workings of the magazine during the 1940's. -Anne M

The boy, the mole, the fox and the horse book cover
The boy, the mole, the fox and the horse book cover

The boy, the mole, the fox and the horse

Charlie Mackesy

GRAPHIC NOVEL Mackesy
Graphic Novels

"A modern, illustrated fable for readers of all ages that explores life's universal lessons from beloved British illustrator Charlie Mackesy"--

Victoria's picture

Absolutely beautiful illustrations to accompany simple yet sage wisdom for the young and the young at heart. This book is the magic bullet elixir your soul needs right now. My family and friends will definitely be receiving a copy this gift-giving season! Available at ICPL as a book and an eBook. -Victoria

The once and future witches book cover
The once and future witches book cover

The once and future witches

Alix E. Harrow

eAUDIO
Fantasy

"In the late 1800s, three sisters use witchcraft to change the course of history in Alix E. Harrow's powerful novel of magic and the suffragette movement. In 1893, there's no such thing as witches. There used to be, in the wild, dark days before the burnings began, but now witching is nothing but tidy charms and nursery rhymes. If the modern woman wants any measure of power, she must find it at the ballot box. But when the Eastwood sisters -- James Juniper, Agnes Amaranth, and Beatrice Belladonna -- join the suffragists of New Salem, they begin to pursue the forgotten words and ways that might turn the women's movement into the witch's movement. Stalked by shadows and sickness, hunted by forces who will not suffer a witch to vote -- and perhaps not even to live -- the sisters will need to delve into the oldest magics, draw new alliances, and heal the bond between them if they want to survive. There's no such thing as witches. But there will be"--

Becky's picture

An engaging tale of three sisters who bring magic and witching back during the time of the women's suffrage movement. A great read for those who enjoy a historical setting, well-developed characters, and a bit of magic. -Becky

Oh She Glows for Dinner: Nourishing Plant-based Meals to Keep You Glowing book cover
Oh She Glows for Dinner: Nourishing Plant-based Meals to Keep You Glowing book cover

Oh She Glows for Dinner: Nourishing Plant-based Meals to Keep You Glowing

Angela Liddon

ON ORDER BOOK
Cookbooks

The author shares her Glow Getters meal prep plans, helpful make-ahead tips, and favorite seasonal and holiday menus, as well as one-pot and on-the-glow meals that will help streamline your busy week. -- Adapted from inside front cover.

Frannie's picture

This book has many favorite recipes from plant based blogger Angela Liddon. The stuffing balls were great for my family's asynchronous Thanksgiving, the savory porridge sold my partner on "porridge", and the raw peanut noodle salad has long been a hot weather favorite. All these recipes are first time in print and do not disappoint! No doubt the best part of this book is the pictures. Personally a cookbook without pictures is useless to me, but thankfully this is choke full. From quick weeknight meals to Sunday dinner show stoppers, there's a lot to love. -Frannie

Braiding sweetgrass book cover
Braiding sweetgrass book cover

Braiding sweetgrass

Robin Wall Kimmerer

508 /Kimmerer
Nature, Science

"As a leading researcher in the field of biology, Robin Wall Kimmerer understands the delicate state of our world. But as an active member of the Potawatomi nation, she senses and relates to the world through a way of knowing far older than any science. In Braiding Sweetgrass, she intertwines these two modes of awareness--the analytic and the emotional, the scientific and the cultural--to ultimately reveal a path toward healing the rift that grows between people and nature. The woven essays that construct this book bring people back into conversation with all that is green and growing; a universe that never stopped speaking to us, even when we forgot how to listen"--

Becky's picture

Blending personal, aesthetic and scientific perspectives on nature, “Braiding Sweetgrass” will have you thinking more about gratitude, restoration, and the relationship between humans and the environment. Kimmerer writes in a poetic style, sharing her own experiences as a mother, a professor, and a Potawatomi woman. A great read! -Becky

The science fiction hall of fame : volume one, 1929-1964 book cover
The science fiction hall of fame : volume one, 1929-1964 book cover

The science fiction hall of fame : volume one, 1929-1964

SCIENCE FICTION Science
Science Fiction

The book you now hold contains twenty-six of the greatest science fiction stories ever written. Robert Heinlein in "The Roads Must Roll" describes an industrial civilization of the future caught up in the deadly flaws of its own complexity. "Country of the Kind," by Damon Knight, is a frightening portrayal of biological mutation. "Nightfall," by Isaac Asimov, one of the greatest stories in the science fiction field, imagines a planet where the sun sets only once every millennium and is a chilling study in mass psychology.

Heidi K's picture

I picked this anthology up for Daniel Keyes' "Flowers for Algernon," but have enjoyed the other stories. I'm not usually big into SCIFI, but this sample platter from the past is fascinating! -Heidi K

Nolo's essential guide to buying your first home. book cover
Nolo's essential guide to buying your first home. book cover

Nolo's essential guide to buying your first home.

643.12 /Nolo
Nonfiction

This timely title will help buyers find the right place to live and invest in--and even enjoy doing it. Filled with interesting facts, real-life stories and insights, and common pitfalls to avoid, this book provides everything to select the right type of home, the right mortgage, and much more.

Heidi K's picture

I'm not going to buy a home any time soon. But, before I find a house that I like, I need to just figure out if home ownership is right for me. What's all involved? What should I know before I start looking and get attached to a place that ultimately is no good for me or my family? Luckily, ICPL has many books about buying a home to help people like me. So far, I've found this guide easy to digest. -Heidi K

The shadows book cover
The shadows book cover

The shadows

Alex North

FICTION North Alex
Fiction, Mystery

"The haunting new thriller from Alex North, author of the New York Times bestseller The Whisper Man You knew a teenager like Charlie Crabtree. A dark imagination, a sinister smile--always on the outside of the group. Some part of you suspected he might be capable of doing something awful. Twenty-five years ago, Crabtree did just that, committing a murder so shocking that it's attracted that strange kind of infamy that only exists on the darkest corners of the internet--and inspired more than one copycat. Paul Adams remembers the case all too well: Crabtree--and his victim--were Paul's friends. Paul has slowly put his life back together. But now his mother, old and senile, has taken a turn for the worse. Though every inch of him resists, it is time to come home. It's not long before things start to go wrong. Reading the news, Paul learns another copycat has struck. His mother is distressed, insistent that there's something in the house. And someone is following him. Which reminds him of the most unsettling thing about that awful day twenty-five years ago. It wasn't just the murder. It was the fact that afterward, Charlie Crabtree was never seen again.."--

Candice's picture

This was a good, spooky read from a new-to-me author. The crimes and mystery surrounding them are unique and have some genuinely creepy elements to them. The main characters and narrators have compelling stories and voices as well, and parts of this book really shine through in their earnestness and feeling. -Candice

Creepy carrots! book cover
Creepy carrots! book cover

Creepy carrots!

Aaron Reynolds

jE Reynolds
Picture Books

The carrots that grow in Crackenhopper Field are the fattest and crispiest around and Jasper Rabbit cannot resist pulling some to eat each time he passes by, until he begins hearing and seeing creepy carrots wherever he goes.

Karen's picture

If your kids like scary but not too scary, they will love this book! -Karen

The book of two ways : a novel book cover
The book of two ways : a novel book cover

The book of two ways : a novel

Jodi Picoult

FICTION Picoult Jodi
Fiction

Dawn Edelstein is on a plane when she is told to prepare for a crash landing. She braces herself as thoughts flash through her mind. The shocking thing is, the thoughts are not of her husband but of a man she last saw fifteen years ago: Wyatt Armstrong. Dawn, miraculously, survives the crash, but so do all the doubts that have suddenly been raised. She has led a good life. Back in Boston, there is her husband, Brian, their beloved daughter, and her work as a death doula. But somewhere in Egypt is Wyatt Armstrong, who works as an archaeologist unearthing ancient burial sites, a career Dawn once studied for but was forced to abandon. The airline ensures that the survivors are seen by a doctor, then offers offers transportation to wherever they want to go. The obvious destination is to fly home, but she could take another path: return to the archaeological site she left years before, reconnect with Wyatt and their unresolved history. As the story unfolds, Dawn's two possible futures unspool side by side, as do the secrets and doubts long buried with them.--Adapted from publisher description.

Victoria's picture

The new Picoult is highly anticipated. If you're waiting for this one, try a favorite Picoult of mine, Small Great Things; a gripping novel about power, privilege and race. Also try Ruth Hogan's The Keeper of Lost Things. -Victoria

Untamed book cover
Untamed book cover

Untamed

Glennon Doyle

BIOGRAPHY Doyle, Glennon

"There is a voice of longing inside every woman. We strive so mightily to be good: good mothers, daughters, partners, employees, citizens, and friends. We believe all this striving will make us feel alive. Instead, it leaves us feeling weary, stuck, overwhelmed, and underwhelmed. We look at our lives, relationships, and world, and wonder: Wasn't it all supposed to be more beautiful than this? We quickly silence that question, telling ourselves to be grateful. We hide our simmering discontent--even from ourselves. Until we reach our boiling point. Four years ago, Glennon Doyle--bestselling Oprah-endorsed author, renowned activist and humanitarian, wife and mother of three--was speaking at a conference when a woman entered the room. Glennon looked at her and fell instantly in love. Three words flooded her mind: There She Is. At first, Glennon assumed these words came to her from on high. Soon she realized that they came to her from within. Glennon was finally hearing her own voice--the voice that had been silenced by decades of cultural conditioning, numbing addictions, and institutional allegiances. This was the voice of the girl Glennon had been before the world told her who to be. She vowed to never again abandon herself. She decided to build a life of her own--one based on her individual desire, intuition, and imagination. She would reclaim her true, untamed self. Soulful and uproarious, forceful and tender, Untamed is both a memoir and a galvanizing wake-up call. It offers a piercing, electrifying examination of the restrictive expectations women are issued from birth; shows how hustling to meet those expectations leaves women feeling dissatisfied and lost; and reveals that when we quit abandoning ourselves and instead abandon the world's expectations of us, we become women who can finally look at our lives and recognize: There She Is. Untamed shows us how to be brave. As Glennon insists: The braver we are, the luckier we get"--

Victoria's picture

I found Glennon Doyle after I read Brene Brown. I think they both have a searing passion for vulnerability and truth. If you're waiting for Untamed, try Brown's Daring Greatly, or a few titles Doyle recommends: Know My Name by Chanel Miller and Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentini. -Victoria

Vesper flights : new and collected essays book cover
Vesper flights : new and collected essays book cover

Vesper flights : new and collected essays

Helen Macdonald

508 /Macdonald
Nonfiction

Macdonald combines some of her best loved essays with new pieces. Her topics range from nostalgia for a vanishing countryside to the tribulations of farming ostriches to her own private vespers while trying to fall asleep. Meditating on notions of captivity and freedom, immigration and flight, she writes about the unexpected guidance and comfort we find when watching wildlife. -- adapted from jacket

Victoria's picture

A great selection of essays that foster solitude, reverence of nature and slowing-down. If you haven't read Macdonald's H is for Hawk, you should check that out. Lab Girl by Hope Jahren would also most-likely be up your alley. -Victoria

The best of me book cover
The best of me book cover

The best of me

David Sedaris

817.54 /Sedaris
Nonfiction

The American humorist, author, and radio contributor shares his most memorable work in a collection of stories and essays that feature him shopping for rare taxidermy, hitchhiking with a quadriplegic, and hand-feeding a carnivorous bird.

Victoria's picture

A great selection of essays spanning his career. If you're waiting for this title, check out Holidays on Ice, by David Sedaris, Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson, or Wow, No Thankyou by Samantha Irby. -Victoria

Transcendent Kingdom book cover
Transcendent Kingdom book cover

Transcendent Kingdom

Yaa Gyasi

FICTION Gyasi Yaa
Fiction

"A novel about faith, science, religion, and family that tells the deeply moving portrait of a family of Ghanaian immigrants ravaged by depression and addiction and grief, narrated by a fifth year candidate in neuroscience at Stanford school of medicine studying the neural circuits of reward seeking behavior in mice"--

Victoria's picture

Gyasi weaves a poignant story of Gifty; a child of an Ghanaian immigrant growing up in the US. Facing loss, dealing with familial addiction and mental illness and the pursuit of excellence, Gyasi adeptly describes a main character who constantly straddles the duality of country and culture. A tender book about deep and difficult subjects. If you're waiting for this book, check out Gyasi's previous novel; Homegoing-an excellent and intrepid historical-fiction work following different Asante descendants and their generational fate. Also check out Behold the Dreamers, by Imbolo Mbue. -Victoria

Hands to heart book cover
Hands to heart book cover

Hands to heart

Alex Bauermeister

jE Bauermei
Picture Books

"With a gentle reminder for children to breathe and to connect their bodies, this beautifully illustrated picture book contains a sweet cast of animal friends to guide young readers from one yoga pose to the next. From reaching your hands up to the sky to stretching like a cat to pressing up like a cobra snake, each posture helps to control breathing, engage in the present moment, and ultimately lead towards calmness and peacefulness. The soothing, rhythmic text paired with illustrations that offer a lot of sweet humor make this book perfect for young readers ready to interact with yoga poses and practice mindfulness."--Amazon.

Karen's picture

During these stressful times, kids need more than ever to manage their own stress. This book teaches kids to slow down, breathe, and connect to their bodies. Illustrations are lovely and pair well with the soothing text. -Karen

One book cover
One book cover

One

Kathryn Otoshi

jE Otoshi
Picture Books

A number/color book reminding us that it just takes one to make everyone count.

Karen's picture

I love this book. Kids learn about numbers, counting, and colors, and they also learn about accepting differences in others. For preschool to first grade. -Karen

Miss Rumphius book cover
Miss Rumphius book cover

Miss Rumphius

Barbara Cooney

jE Cooney
Picture Books

As a child Great-aunt Alice Rumphius resolved that when she grew up she would go to faraway places, live by the sea in her old age, and do something to make the world more beautiful--and she does all those things, the last being the most difficult of all.

Karen's picture

When my kids were young, I read this book to them many times because of its message. "Find something to make the world more beautiful." A beautiful book about a woman wanting to make the world a better place, and she does. -Karen

The cool bean book cover
The cool bean book cover

The cool bean

Jory John

jE John
Picture Books

Everyone knows the cool beans. They're sooooo cool. And then there's the uncool has-bean ... Always on the sidelines, one bean unsuccessfully tries everything he can to fit in with the crowd--until one day the cool beans show him how it's done.

Karen's picture

A clever story about how to teach kids coolness for good. -Karen

Don't worry, little crab book cover
Don't worry, little crab book cover

Don't worry, little crab

Chris Haughton

jE Haughton
Picture Books

"Little Crab and Very Big Crab live in a tiny rock pool near the sea. Today they're going for a dip in the big ocean. 'This is going to be so great, ' says Little Crab, splish-splashing and squelch-squelching along, all the way to the very edge. Then comes a first glance down at the waves. WHOOSH! Maybe it's better if they don't go in? With vivid colors, bold shapes, and his trademark visual humor, Chris Haughton shows that sometimes a gentle 'don't worry, I'm here' can keep tentative little crabs sidestepping ahead--and help them discover the brilliant worlds that await when they take the plunge."--Amazon.

Karen's picture

My grandson loved this book! It’s a sweet story about bravery and overcoming fear. Preschool to first grade. -Karen

Hands to Heart  book cover
Hands to Heart  book cover

Hands to Heart

Alex Bauermeister

jE/Bauermei
Picture Books

With a gentle reminder for children to breathe and to connect their bodies, this beautifully illustrated picture book contains a sweet cast of animal friends to guide young readers from one yoga pose to the next. From reaching your hands up to the sky to stretching like a cat to pressing up like a cobra snake, each posture helps to control breathing, engage in the present moment, and ultimately lead towards calmness and peacefulness. The soothing, rhythmic text paired with illustrations that offer a lot of sweet humor make this book perfect for young readers ready to interact with yoga poses and practice mindfulness.

Karen's picture

During these stressful times, kids need more than ever to manage their stress. This book teaches kids to slow down, breathe, and connect to their bodies. Illustrations are lovely and pair well with the soothing text. -Karen

I believe I can book cover
I believe I can book cover

I believe I can

Grace Byers

jE Byers
Picture Books

"From the New York Times bestselling creators of I Am Enough comes an empowering follow-up that celebrates every child's limitless potential. I Believe I Can is an affirmation for boys and girls of every background to love and believe in themselves"--Amazon.com.

Karen's picture

Grace Byers does a wonderful job inspiring a child to believe in being whatever they want to be. A positive read with beautiful illustrations. -Karen

The hike book cover
The hike book cover

The hike

Alison Farrell

jE Farrell
Picture Books

"The Hike is a plucky and sweet adventure story about three intrepid young female explorers set out to conquer the outdoors in their local forest. Here is the best and worst of any hike: from picnics to puffing and panting, deer-sighting to detours. This spirited picture book is filled with lyrical language that captures the majesty of the natural world, coupled with a fun narrative throughout. Features a glossary and scientific backmatter. Includes a sketchbook by one of the characters that highlights aspects of the hike. Abundant labels throughout for scientific learning. The Hike is about how fun it can be to explore nature in your own backyard. This book is a must-have for budding scientists, best friends, and all adventurers in preschool and kindergarten." --

Karen's picture

This is a sweet book about three young explorers who set out to explore their local forest. -Karen

In the middle of fall book cover
In the middle of fall book cover

In the middle of fall

Kevin Henkes

jE Henkes
Picture Books

"Introduces concepts and vocabulary of fall--autumn colors, changes in plants and animals ... and wind, which soon leads to the next season"--

Karen's picture

I love Kevin Henkes's books. This is a gentle story that teaches young children about the transitions from fall to winter. Great for preschool. -Karen

The snowy day book cover
The snowy day book cover

The snowy day

Ezra Jack Keats

jE Keats

The adventures of a little boy in the city on a very snowy day.

Karen's picture

This is my favorite winter book. I read this book every winter during outreach storytime visits. -Karen

Miss Rumphius book cover
Miss Rumphius book cover

Miss Rumphius

Barbara Cooney

jE/Cooney
Picture Books

As a child Great-aunt Alice Rumphius resolved that when she grew up she would go to faraway places, live by the sea in her old age, and do something to make the world more beautiful--and she does all those things, the last being the most difficult of all.

Karen's picture

A beautiful book about a woman wanting to make the world more beautiful, and she does by planting lupins. -Karen

Network effect book cover
Network effect book cover

Network effect

Martha Wells

SCIENCE FICTION Wells Martha
Science Fiction

"Murderbot returns in its highly-anticipated, first, full-length standalone novel, Network Effect. You know that feeling when you're at work, and you've had enough of people, and then the boss walks in with yet another job that needs to be done right this second or the world will end, but all you want to do is go home and binge your favorite shows? And you're a sentient murder machine programmed for destruction? Congratulations, you're Murderbot. Come for the pew-pew space battles, stay for the most relatable A.I. you'll read this century. I'm usually alone in my head, and that's where 90 plus percent of my problems are. When Murderbot's human associates (not friends, never friends) are captured and another not-friend from its past requires urgent assistance, Murderbot must choose between inertia and drastic action. Drastic action it is, then"--Amazon.com.

Brian's picture

After a series of novellas, we have our first full-length Murderbot novel, and it is fantastic. The novellas were always over too soon, so I'm pleased to say that a novel is a perfect fit for my favorite anti-social cyborg. If you haven't read any of these, I'd suggest starting with "All Systems Red." This is one of those series that just keeps getting better. This is great Sci-Fi! -Brian

A single thread book cover
A single thread book cover

A single thread

Tracy Chevalier

FICTION Chevalie Tracy
Historical Fiction

1932. After the Great War took both her beloved brother and her fiancé, Violet Speedwell has become a "surplus woman," one of a generation doomed to a life of spinsterhood after the war killed so many young men. Yet Violet cannot reconcile herself to a life spent caring for her grieving, embittered mother. After countless meals of boiled eggs and dry toast, she saves enough to move out of her mother's place and into the town of Winchester, home to one of England's grandest cathedrals. There, Violet is drawn into a society of broderers--women who embroider kneelers for the Cathedral, carrying on a centuries-long tradition of bringing comfort to worshippers. Violet finds support and community in the group, fulfillment in the work they create, and even a growing friendship with the vivacious Gilda. But when forces threaten her new independence and another war appears on the horizon, Violet must fight to put down roots in a place where women aren't expected to grow.

Anne M's picture

This is a splendid book and I know right off the bat, my explanation won't do it justice. Set in England between the wars, A Single Thread follows Violet Speedwell, a woman (approaching 40--her mother's tragedy, not Violet's) who feels lost, but finds meaning in embroidery. But it is more than that. It is also about finding kindred spirits and understanding through each other's art. It is about loss and finding support. Tracy Chevalier's books are always wonderful and this is no exception. A patron recommended this to me and for that I am grateful. -Anne M

American predator : the hunt for the most meticulous serial killer of the 21st century  book cover
American predator : the hunt for the most meticulous serial killer of the 21st century  book cover

American predator : the hunt for the most meticulous serial killer of the 21st century


True Crime

Mari's picture

I enjoyed this super fast read about a serial killer most people have never heard of. This true crime narrative has all of the details you want chronologically about how serial killer Israel Keyes got caught and confessed and none of the information you don't want, or at least I don't. This book delves into interrogation tactics from the police and FBI and psychoanalyzes the childhood of a calculated murderer who managed to abscond law enforcement across several states and over a dozen murders in a post 9/11 high security world. -Mari

Decolonize Your Diet book cover
Decolonize Your Diet book cover

Decolonize Your Diet

Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel


Cookbooks

Great Exploration into Indigenous Mexican Cuisine!

Victoria's picture

The author Michael Pollan advises in Food Rules, "Don't eat anything your grandmother wouldn't recognize;" meaning the food industry has radically changed; especially the Western diet. These words rang particularly true when Decolonize Your Diet co-author Luz Calvo was diagnosed with breast cancer (despite being a vegetarian for 15 years.) She began to research and found that immigrant born Latinas had significantly lower rates of breast cancer than US born Latinas; prompting her to revisit the indigenous cuisine of Mexico. What follows in this cookbook are some amazing recipes cooked with high amounts of fiber, fruits, vegetables and revolutionary love. Fans of Sean Sherman and Beth Dooley's The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen and Michael W. Twitty's The Cooking Gene will deeply appreciate this cookbook. Also, try the Caldo De Quinoa; it's a great soup and Winter is Coming! -Victoria

Pachinko book cover
Pachinko book cover

Pachinko

Min Jin Lee

FICTION Lee Min
Fiction, Historical Fiction

"A new tour de force from the bestselling author of Free Food for Millionaires, for readers of The Kite Runner and Cutting for Stone. PACHINKO follows one Korean family through the generations, beginning in early 1900s Korea with Sunja, the prized daughter of a poor yet proud family, whose unplanned pregnancy threatens to shame them all. Deserted by her lover, Sunja is saved when a young tubercular minister offers to marry and bring her to Japan. So begins a sweeping saga of an exceptional family in exile from its homeland and caught in the indifferent arc of history. Through desperate struggles and hard-won triumphs, its members are bound together by deep roots as they face enduring questions of faith, family, and identity"--

Jason's picture

Terrific historical detail, an engaging story, and compelling characters. -Jason